Roll of Honour

Private JOHN HOWARD ALLCOTT  

 7th Leicestershire Regiment (116627)

John was born c.1894, the son of John and Emma Allcott of Old Rail Farm, Hurley Common, later Tollgate Farm, Bentley. His family spent a brief time in Darlington before settling in Market Bosworth. John worked at Kingsbury Colliery before he enlisted in July 1915 and was killed in action in France on November 16th 1916 aged 22. He is buried in Vermelles British Cemetery.  

Rifleman JOSEPH ALLTON 

12th King’s Royal Rifle Corps (R/2089)

Joe was born at Hurley in 1887, the son of Tom and Ann Allton. He was a miner all his working life and spent time in Shirebrook, Nottinghamshire before moving to Nuneaton after his wife Elizabeth died leaving him with a young family. He enlisted in September 1914 and embarked for France on July 23rd 1915. He was wounded in the April of 1916 and killed in action on June 2nd aged 29, possibly at the Battle of Mount Sorrel. His brother Harold also served during the war as did another brother Vincent who died in action in 1918 (see below). Joe is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres.

Corporal VINCENT JAMES ALLTON (MM)  

1st Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment (32847)

Vincent was born at Hurley in 1897, the son of Tom and Ann Alton and younger brother of Joe Allton. He enlisted in January 1916 and from March 3rd until June 11th 1917 was 'home', after which he was posted to France. He died in action in France on 29th October 1918, aged 21. He is buried at Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine-Au-Bois. He was awarded the Military Medal for reasons as yet unknown.

Private GEORGE ARCHER 

8th Devonshire Regiment (22667)

George was born in Whitacre c.1877, the son of John and Martha Archer who later lived in Wood End. While his father and several brothers worked at a local colliery, he was as a farm labourer who moved to Monmouth to find work. He was killed in action in Belgium on October 26th 1917 aged 40. His battalion suffered significant losses during the Third Ypres and the unsuccessful assault south of the Menin Road on 26th October which was the day upon which he died. George is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. His brothers John and Tom also died during WW1 (see below)

Sapper JOHN ARCHER  

185th Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers (132621)

John was born c.1787, another son of John and Martha Archer of Wood End and the brother of George Archer, [see above]. He was a miner who moved to Rotherham with his wife Mary Jane to live with his brother Tom's family. John and Tom (see below) both enlisted as Royal Engineers and he died in England on 19th March 1918 age 40. He is buried in Rotherham's Moorgate Cemetery.

Sapper THOMAS ARCHER  

180th Tunnelling Company, Royal Engineers (132622)

Tom was born at Grendon c.1771, the son of John and Martha Archer of Wood End and the brother of George and John Archer, [see above]. He lived in Rotherham with his wife Lucy, and her three children and worked as a miner. He and his brother John both enlisted as Royal Engineers and he was killed in action in France on 10th November 1915 aged 44. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

C. AUKETT

This man has yet to be identified. 


Lance Corporal WILLIAM EDWARD BAILEY 

19th Service Battalion, Middlesex Regiment (2069)

William was born in Glascote in 1884, the eldest son of Edward and Emma Bailey. The family later lived in Kingsbury and he and his wife Nellie had two children. William was employed at Kingsbury Colliery as a miner and enlisted in Birmingham in April 1915. His regiment embarked for France on 1st May 1916 and he was killed in action in Belgium on 10th March 1917 aged 32. He died instantly whilst working in the trenches when a shell burst some distance away sending a flying splinter which caught him in the shoulder. He is buried in Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Ypres.


Private WILLIAM CHARLES BEALE 

Royal Warwickshire Regiment (10887), Labour Corps (603186)

William was born in Walkerville, Ontario c.1877, the son of Edward and Mary Beale. The family returned to England to live and William came to Piccadilly with his wife Lillian where he worked in the colliery’s wagon repair shop. He originally served with The Royal Warwickshire Regiment and later the Labour Corps, arriving in France in May 1915 and discharged in April 1919. He died at Piccadilly on 11th May 1921, aged 40 from illness brought on by the effects of war. He was given a military funeral at Kingsbury

Private Walter BAYTON 

4th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment (12169)

Walter was born in Wigginton in 1889, the son of William and Elizabeth Bayton who later lived in Wood End. He enlisted in Birmingham and was first stationed at Dover Castle as a transport driver. He was killed in action at Gallipoli on 10th July 1915 aged 25. According the battalion's war diary he may have been helping to shorten their line by digging across the triangle of captured Turkish trenches on the day he died. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli.


2nd Lieutenant WILLIAM BULLOCK 

6th Alexandra, Princess of Wales’ Own (Yorkshire Hussars Regiment)

William was born at Marcham, Berks in 1891, the son of James and Rachel Bullock. After his father died and his mother remarried, they moved to Wood End. There Walter worked as a miner and was married with two children. He enlisted in August 1914 and after service in the Dardanelles, was invalided home. He re-enlisted and after some months in France, was twice more wounded, the second time fatally in the chest. He died on May 12th 1918 at the General Hospital in Calais aged 27. He is buried in Les Baraques Military Cemetery.


Private ROBERT BURTON 

6th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (12259)

Robert was born in Minworth in 1894, the son of Henry and Ann Maria Burton. His family moved to Hurley where they lived at Manor House Farm in Foul End. Robert came from a large family of eleven children. He enlisted in Birmingham and was killed in action in France on Sunday 3rd September 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and also at Minworth School.


Private GEORGE WILLIAM CARNELL

North Staffordshire Regiment (9785), 2nd North Midland Field Co. of Royal Engineers (1115)

Royal Warwickshire Regiment (24359)

George was born in Burton upon Trent in 1879 and he and his wife Clara lived in Brownhills with their young family. He was a miner who moved to Bedworth before coming to Hurley. In February 1897 he enlisted in the North Staffordshire Regiment where he remained until February 1909. He then joined the Royal Engineers for a year until discharged at his own bidding. He was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted from the Colliery during the initial recruitment drive in 1914 and joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He died in the Tamworth area on 1st June 1920, age 41. It is not known where he is buried.


Private HARRY CHAPMAN (MM)

2nd Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) (21051)

Harry was born in Shuttington in 1892, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Chapman who later lived in Wood End. He, his father and two brothers were coal miners at Kingsbury Colliery. Harry enlisted in December 1914 and went to France on August l6th 1915, fighting through the battles of Hooge, Loos, and the Somme. He was awarded the Military Medal in the Battle of Cambrai for 'good work in the field' and was killed in action on March 23rd 1918 aged 25. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

Rifleman HENRY BURDETT CLEMENTS

8th Kings Royal Rifle Corps (12241)

Harry was born in Dosthill in 1897, the son of Albert and Ellen Elizabeth Clements. The family lived briefly at the Dog and Doublet pub in Bodymoor Heath, but returned to Dosthill where Harry worked at a local colliery. He enlisted in Birmingham in January 1915 and his regiment spent time in Portsea training before leaving for France in December 1915. He served ‘in the field’ throughout 1916-17 having been wounded once in that time. He was killed in action in Belgium on 3rd December 1917 whilst on duty in the trenches, and he is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial and Dosthill War memorial.

Private JOHN THOMAS COTON 

1st West Yorkshire Regiment (15216)

John was born in Wilnecote in 1873, the son of Thomas and Edith Coton. He grew up in Dosthill and worked as a labourer at a local brickyard. He and his wife Constance lived in Nuneaton and Wilnecote before coming to Piccadilly where John worked at Kingsbury Colliery. He first went to France in August 1915 and in July 1916, was in Wigan Hospital recovering from a shrapnel wound in his right leg incurred during a military charge on July 1st, the first fatal day of the Battle of the Somme. He died at home in Dosthill on 2nd December 1918, from the effects of the war aged 45. He is buried in Dosthill Churchyard.

Private FREDERICK DUKES

2nd Prince of Wales's Own, West Yorkshire Regiment (15217)

Fred was born in Rugeley in 1879, the son of labourer John Dukes and his wife Mary. He worked as a miner before coming to Kingsbury to live with his sister Mary Jane Olney. Fred was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted from the Colliery during the initial recruitment drive in 1914. He enlisted in Birmingham and arrived in France on 17th August 1915. He met his death on 16th August 1917 when his battalion was involved in an attack on German positions near Frezenberg on the first day of the Battle of Langemarck. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium

Sapper ARTHUR F. FINNEY 

184th Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers (96848)

Arthur was born in Wood End in 1896, the son of Annie Finney from Bodymoor Heath and stepson of Alfred Baker. Most of his family worked as coal miners including Arthur who worked at Birch Coppice Colliery. He served in France for just over two years having gone out with a miners' contingent from Wilnecote. He was killed in action in Belgium on 18th July 1917 aged 21 and buried at Bleuet Farm Cemetery  


Private CHARLES PERCY FINNEY  

Royal Warwickshire Regiment (15604)

Charles was born in Wood End in 1890, the son of Charles and Emma Finney. His father was an agricultural labourer from Hints who later became a miner. Charles followed suit as a colliery labourer. He served three years in Mesopotamia before returning home and died in Clipston Camp, Nottinghamshire on 11th March 1919, aged 28. He is buried in Hurley Cemetery.

Private EMANUEL FOSTER

9th Battalion, London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers (16494)

Emmanuel was born in Chell, Staffordshire in 1894, the son of Enoch and Barbara Foster. His father was a miner and the family lived for a while in Tunstall before coming to Piccadilly. Emanuel was also a miner and enlisted in 1915. His regiment arrived in France on 15th June 1915 where he died on Thursday, 11th May 1916 aged 23. He is commemorated on The Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais

W. FOSTER 

This man has yet to be identified. 

Private THOMAS FOX 

7th Prince of Wales’s, North Staffordshire (25646)

Thomas was born in Chesterfield in 1891, the son of Thomas and Annie Fox. After his mother died, his father remarried and the family moved to Glascote. His father was a railway foreman while Thomas worked at Messrs Fisher and Company's Paper Mills in Kettlebrook where he and his wife Elsie lived. He enlisted in June 1916 and was mobilised to Mesopotamia in October 1916. He was killed in action near Kut on 25 February 1917, two days before his 26th birthday. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq

Private JAMES ARTHUR GIBSON 

217th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (266844)

James was born in Etwall c.1894, the son of James and Mary Gibson. For a while he lived in Polesworth with his sister as a farm labourer before moving to Wood End with his family to work as a bricklayer's labourer. He enlisted in March 1916 and went to France on July 24th. He was killed in action there on 9th April 1917 aged 23. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Private SAM HARRIS  

1st Leicestershire Regiment, 1st battalion (12079)

Sam was born in Wood End in 1886, the youngest son of Joseph and Anne Harris. He worked at a local colliery and he and his wife Florence had three children. At the time he enlisted in September 1914, they had moved to Mansfield where Sam worked at Mansfield Colliery. His regiment embarked from Southampton as part of the British Expeditionary Force on 23rd February 1915 and he was killed in action in Belgium on 16th March 1916 aged 29. He is buried in White House Cemetery


Bombardier GEORGE JOHN HAWKES

32nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery (22619)

George was born in Kingsbury in 1876, the son of Edward and Sarah Jane Hawkes. He and his father worked at the local brickworks. George arrived in France on 9th July 1915, was injured two years later, and died of his wounds in Belgium on 22nd October 1917. He met his death during the Third Battle of Ypres at a time of heavy fighting in the Salient. The casualty clearing station where he probably died was very close to the Front line and suffered from shelling. He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Ypres

Rifleman VICTOR JOHN HAYES  

9th Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort’s Own) (S1238)

Victor was born in Walsall c.1896, the son of Thomas and Priscilla Hayes who later lived in Wood End. He and his six brothers all worked at Kingsbury Colliery. He enlisted in Birmingham in September 1914 and had been in France just over a year when he was shot by a sniper on June 12th 1916. He succumbed to his wounds two days later on June 14th aged 20. He is buried in Habarcq Communal Cemetery.

Private EDWARD JOHN HEATHCOTE  

7th Leicestershire Regiment (36311)

Edward was born in Whittington in 1896, the son of farm worker John and Jane Heathcote. The family moved to Freasley and Edward worked at Hall End Colliery. He married his wife Amelia literally just before he died and never saw his baby daughter who was born after his death. Edward enlisted in 1914 and was killed in action in France on May 3rd 1917 aged 21. He had been wounded but continued fighting until he was hit by a stray bullet and killed instantly. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial

Corporal ROBERT LOMAS INSLEY

1st/5th Northumberland Fusiliers (1449)

Robert was born in Drayton Bassett in 1886, the son of George and Elizabeth Insley. He was a brickyard worker who later joined his two brothers at Kingsbury Colliery. He was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted from the Colliery during the initial recruitment drive in 1914. He arrived in France in the August, as part of the British Expeditionary Force, and was killed on 8th November 1914 during the First Battle of Ypres. He had been wounded in the back by a sniper and, whilst the wound was being dressed, the Germans opened a heavy shellfire and his body was never recovered. He was 28. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial .

Corporal OSCAR JOHNSON 

11th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (16073)

Oscar was born in Birmingham c.1897, the youngest son of George and Emilia Johnson who later ran the Wood End Stores. Oscar was a butcher's labourer who enlisted in Birmingham and was killed in action in France on 24th April 1917 aged 20. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial

Gunner JOHN ‘Jack’ LANE 

7th Trench Mortar Battery attached to the 406th Battery Royal Field Artillery (227109)

Jack was born in Kingsbury in 1899, the son of Charlie and Sarah Jane Lane. His father was originally a brickyard labourer but transferred to Kingsbury Colliery and the family moved to Piccadilly. Jack was also employed at the Colliery and went to France in June 1918. He died on 25th October 1918 near Ypres as a result of wounds received in action there. He was struck in the thigh and buttock by shell pieces and never recovered. He was only 19 and is buried Duhallow ADS Cemetery, Belgium

2nd Lieutenant IRA CYRIL LLOYD 

Ira was born in Walsall Wood 1891, the youngest son of John and Mary Ann Lloyd. He was an electrician at Walsall Wood Colliery and later lived in Wood End with his brother Richard who was a miner. Ira was a keen cricketer for the Piccadilly team. He enlisted at Brownhills in June 1908 and trained with the 2nd North Midland Field Company until May 1911 when he was discharged. From July 1915 he served in France with the Worcestershire Regiment and died in Rouen from influenza on 24th November 1918 age 27. He is buried in the St Sever Cemetery Extension.  

Private WILLIAM JOSEPH MEER 

Leicestershire Regiment (13431), 2nd Lincolnshire Regiment (14146)

William was born in Hurley in 1878, the youngest surviving son of Thomas and Ann Meer. His father was an ironstone miner from a long established Hurley family and his mother came from Baddesley Ensor. The family moved to Wood End and William worked as a miner. After he married, he and his wife Ada lived in Nottinghamshire. He enlisted at Shirebrook and was killed in action in France on 1st July 1916 aged 37. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Private FRANK OAKLEY (MM) 

West Yorkshire Regiment, Labour Corps (14/15513), 58th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) (3422)

Frank was born in Northfield in 1881 and he and his wife Agnes lived in Beoley where he was a farm worker. He moved to Piccadilly to work at Kingsbury Colliery and had eight children. He was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted from the Colliery during the initial recruitment drive in 1914 and died in Belgium from the effects of gas poisoning on 2nd August 1917 aged 44. He was awarded the military medal in June 1917 for 'gallant and soldierly conduct'. He is buried at Locre Hospice Cemetery, Belgium.


Lance Corporal WILLIAM HEWITT PAGE

1st Royal Warwickshire (2153)

William was born in Sparkbrook in 1891, the only son of William and Mary Ada Page. He moved to Kingsbury to work in the Traffic-Control Section at Kingsbury Station and was the first employee to enlist in September 1914. His regiment arrived in France on July 29th 1915 and he was killed in action on 17th April 1918 almost certainly defending Hinges Ridge during The Battle of Hazebrouck. He was 26. William is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais and on the Midland Railway employees' War Memorial outside Derby Station.

Sergeant WILLIAM PARKES 

13th Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort’s Own) (S/1471)

William was possibly born in Tipton c.1892, the son of Thomas and Jane Parkes from West Bromwich. His father was an iron worker and William appears to have been a barber. He enlisted in Birmingham and was killed in action in France on 8th May 1918. He is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.

Private PHILIP SIDNEY PEACOCK

Somerset Light Infantry (17722), 1st Battalion, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry (21460)

Philip was born in Bristol in 1892, the son of Sidney and Catherine Peacock. He first worked in the printing business before moving to Kingsbury to work as a porter in the Traffic-Control Section at Kingsbury Station. He enlisted in Birmingham and arrived in France on July 20th 1915 where he was badly wounded. After his recovery he was sent to the Cameroons where he was again seriously wounded and died on April 30th 1916 aged 24. He is commemorated on The Kirkee Memorial in India and on the War Memorial outside Derby Station.

Sapper GEORGE RAMSDALL  

Royal Berkshire Regiment (8/14598), 173rd Tunnelling Company, Royal Engineers (155863)

George was born in Cliff in 1894, the son of John David and Harriet Ramsdall. The family lived in Wood End and George worked at Hall End Colliery. He enlisted in Birmingham in September 1914 as a volunteer in Lord Kitchener's New Army and his regiment was posted to France in August 1915. He was transferred to the 173rd Tunnelling Company in February 1916. He survived exposure to poison gas but after rejoining his unit, was killed in action at Ypres on 16th June 1917 aged 23. He is buried at Bard Cottage Cemetery.


Gunner THOMAS ALFRED RICHMOND 

353rd Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery (56971 )

Thomas was born in Ullenhall in 1892, the son of William and Mary Jane Richmond. He and his wife Marion lived there and he was a miner. As yet his connection with Hurley is unclear but he enlisted in Nuneaton in August 1915 and embarked from Southampton on May 5th 1916 arriving in Rouen the following day. Nine months later he was sent back to England to recover from injuries to his left thigh and right wrist. He was wounded again back in France and died on October 15th 1917 as a consequence of them. He is buried at Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extension.

Rifleman FREDERICK THOMAS SALT 

10th King’s Royal Rifle Corps(R/1750)

Fred was born in Coleshill in 1887, the son of William and Elizabeth Salt who later lived in Kingsbury before moving to farm in Great Barr. After his father died, his mother took work in Fazeley as a housekeeper while Fred lodged in Hurley and worked as a miner. He enlisted at Birmingham in September 1914 and was part of the British Expeditionary Force that embarked to France in July 1915. He was killed in action in Belgium on 18th February 1916 age 29. He is buried in Essex Farm Cemetery, West Vlaanderen.

Private GEORGE SALT  

1st Leicestershire Regiment (10373)

George was born in Hurley in 1895, the son of Charles and Elizabeth Salt. He started work as a colliery screen's hand and enlisted in August 1914. He contracted pleurisy in September 1915 and was sent home to recuperate. On February 20th 1916 he was part of the Expeditionary Force that left Southampton for France and died on 9th June 1916 as a result of a gunshot wound to the head during the Battle of Ypres. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium along with his brother Harry (see below).

Lance Corporal HARRY GEORGE SALT  

11th Prince of Wales’ Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) (14573), Machine Gun Corp

Harry was born in Hurley c.1888, another son of Charles and Elizabeth Salt. He was a miner and he and his wife was Lucy had no children. He went to the front in June 1915 and died of wounds in Belgium on 8th June 1917 aged 29. He is buried at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium with his brother George.

Corporal REGINALD WALTER SAVILLE

8th Battalion, 3rd South Lancashire Regiment (19200)

Reggie was born in Derby in 1889, the youngest son of William and Mary Saville. He worked as railway booking clerk, moving around the system until he ended up in the Traffic-Control Section at Kingsbury Station. He enlisted at Derby in May 1915 and arrived in France in March 1916. He was wounded in his right thigh at Ancre Heights during the Battle of the Somme, and died in hospital from his injuries on 27th October 1916 aged 27. He is buried at the Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais and also named on the War Memorial outside Derby Station.

Private ARTHUR SHILTON  

9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (10742)

Arthur was born in Baxterley in 1884, the son of William and Hannah Shilton. After both his parents died, he lived with his brother William in Baxterley as a miner. He and his wife Annie had a daughter. He enlisted in November 1915 and died in Mesopotamia on 29th May 1916 aged 32. He is buried in the Amara War Cemetery in Iraq.

Private WILLIAM JOHN SHILTON 

1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (15602)

William was born in Hurley Common in 1893, the son of William and Mary Jane Shilton. They moved to Wood End where his father was later a platelayer at a local colliery and William a general labour on the colliery surface. He enlisted in November 1915 and was killed in action in France on 15th May 1918 aged 25. He is buried at Mont-Bernenchon British Cemetery, Pas de Calais.

Private ALBERT SMITH 

Royal Warwickshire Regiment (24497), 1st Worcestershire Regiment (41206)

Albert was born in Kingsbury in 1892, the son of James and Lucy Smith. He worked at Kingsbury and Birch Coppice Collieries and was engaged to be married. He enlisted in March 1917, initially serving in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment before transferring to the Worcestershire Regiment and going to France on 2nd June 1917. He met his death near Ypres on 28th December 1917 aged 24 whilst carrying an officer who had been wounded. A machine gun bullet struck him on the head and wounded the officer again.

He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium

Corporal ERNEST BURWOOD SMITH

Royal Garrison Artillery (149497)

Ernest was born in Battersea in 1885, the son of Frederick and Emma Smith. He worked in a cotton mill in Belper before coming to Kingsbury to work as a miner. He lived at The Woodlands where his wife Emily ran a small shop. Ernest was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted from the Colliery during the initial recruitment drive in 1914. He spent his three years of service based in England and was discharged in June 1917 due to very poor health. He died at his home on 11 April 1919 as a result aged 34. His burial place has yet to be established but is most probably at Kingsbury .

Private JOHN SMITH  

1st Worcestershire Regiment (203273)

John was born in Wilnecote c.1880, the son of William and Julia Smith of Whateley, later Wood End. He worked in a local colliery before moving to Tunnel Colliery in Stockingford. He enlisted in the 19th Hussars in August 1914 and was later transferred to the Worcestershire Regiment. He was wounded twice and had only recently returned to the front line when he was killed on 27th September 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres. He was 37 and is buried at Prowse Point Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Private WILFRED SMITH  

Royal Berkshire Regiment (11823), Machine Gun Corps (133167),

1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (425261)

Wilfred was born in Hurley in 1897, the youngest son of William and Sarah Smith. He was a miner who enlisted in September 1914 and was stationed at the Victoria Barracks in Portsmouth. There he suffered from rheumatism and arthritis in his hands caused by cold and exposure. In April 1915 he was discharged as no longer medically fit for service but he soon re-enlisted in the Machine Gun Corps and was transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was wounded on October 24th 1918 and died in France on 3rd November 1918 aged 21. He is buried in Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy, Pas-de-Calais.

Private PERCY SOUTH  

1st / 8th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (42753)

Percy was born in Snitterfield in 1890, the son of Robert and Kate South. His father was a shepherd, moving from place to place to find work. They eventually settled in Wood End and Percy found work as a miner at Hall End Colliery. He enlisted in April 1918 and was killed in action in France on 4th November 1918 aged 28. He is buried at Landrecies British Cemetery.

Sergeant CHARLES VICTOR STAPLES 

Royal Field Artillery (100303), Royal Irish Rifles (8178),

Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) (11661)

Vic was born in Leicester in 1898, the son of Walter and Maria Staples. The family lived near Rugby, later Wood End before moving to Piccadilly where Vic worked as a miner. He initially served in the Royal Field Artillery and the Royal Irish Rifles and during 1915 spent time in Egypt. He was then transferred to the Western Front and was killed on August 16th 1917 during the Battle of Langemarck. He was 20 years old and commended for the Military Medal. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Rifleman FRANK STARKEY  

3rd Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort's Own) (21935) 

Frank was born in Wilnecote in 1895, the son of Charles and Annie Starkey who later lived in Hurley. His father was a miner and Frank worked as farm labourer in Newton Regis. He enlisted in Winchester in September 1914 and transferred to the front on January 29th 1915 as part of the British Expeditionary Force. He was killed in action in Ypres on 13th February 1916 aged 21. He is buried in the Menin Road South Military Cemetery, West Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Private EDWARD ALFRED STEPHENS

16th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (18132)

Edward is thought to have born in Norton, Radnorshire in 1886, the son of Edward and Margaret Stephens who later lived in Alvecote Heath. His father was a shepherd and after his mother died, the family moved to Stonydelph, Amington where Alfred and his two brothers worked at a local colliery. He died in France from wounds on Sunday 10th September 1916 aged 29 and is buried at St Pierre Cemetery, Amiens. He is also commemorated on the Amington War memorial

Lieutenant Corporal HAROLD STEPHENS 

North Staffordshire Regiment (7654), East Yorkshire Regiment (18215)

83rd Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) (48193)

Harold was born in Warley c.1891, the son of John and Florence Stephens, later of Wood End. He worked at Birch Coppice Colliery and joined the Army Reserve at Tamworth in March 1912, being assigned to the North Staffordshire Regiment, later the East Yorkshire Regiment. He arrived in Salonika in November 1915 and was there transferred to the Machine Gun Corps in May 1916. He was hospitalised with wounds to his right shoulder and feet and died as a result on 20th November 1916 aged 26. He is buried in the Anglo-French Military Cemetery at Salonika.

Private WALTER STEVENSON 

Leicestershire Regiment (13888), 2nd Lincolnshire (14212)

Walter was born in Glascote in 1889, the son of Edward and Zillah Stevenson. His family moved to Wilnecote before coming to Piccadilly where Walter worked as a miner before moving to Mansfield as a colliery under-manager. He and his wife Lilian had two sons. He originally served in the Leicestershire Regiment before transferring to the Lincolnshire Regiment and arrived in France in February 1915. He fought at the Battles of Neuve Chapelle, Ypres and Armentieres and was killed on 1st July 1916, during the first day of the Battle of the Somme. He was 27 years old and is buried at Lonsdale Cemetery.

Lance Corporal JOHN THOMPSON 

D Company, 1st/6th Battalion, Prince of Wales, North Staffordshire Regiment (242565)

Jack was born in Dosthill c.1894, the son of Joseph and Jane Thompson. His family moved first to Wood End and then Piccadilly while Jack worked at Hall End Colliery. He joined the 6th North Staffordshire Territorials in January 1912, before transferring to the 1st North Staffordshires in 1914. He arrived in France in September 1914 and saw service on the Aisne and at Armentieres. He was wounded in 1915 and gassed near Messines in 1916. He was killed by a German sniper on 24th May 1917 whilst he and two comrades bombed the enemy out of their trenches during the attack on Nash Alley. He was 23 and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial in France. Three of Jack's brothers served during the Great War and all survived.

Private ALFRED JOHN TURNER

2nd Essex Regiment (7111)

Alfred was born in Stepney in 1882, the son of dock worker Alfred and Emily Turner. He also worked as a dock hand before coming to Kingsbury to work as a miner. He and his wife Louisa had two daughters. He was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted from the Colliery during the initial recruitment drive in 1914. He joined the Essex Regiment and arrived in France on September 14th 1914. He was killed in action on 25th January 1915 at Le Gheer at a time when there were no major battles and trench warfare was deadlocked. He was 32 and is buried at Calvaire (Essex) Military Cemetery, Belgium.  

2nd Lieutenant REGINALD ROBERT WALLIS

Army Service Corps (S4/060463), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, attached 7th Norfolk (41206)

Reginald was born in Bredwardine, Hereford in 1896, the son of Thomas and Kate Wallis. His father was the headmaster of Kingsbury School and his mother was also a teacher there. Reginald was employed in the office of a chartered accountant in Birmingham and initially served in the Army Service Corps. He arrived in France in November 1915 and met his death on 26th March 1918 during the early days of the German Spring Offensive. The day he died, Albert and Noyon were lost to the Germans in the aftermath of the Battle of Bapaume. He was 22 and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France.

Private EDWARD ALFRED WARDEN 

2nd/6th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (203712)

Edward was born c.1888, the son of William and Sarah Warden. He and his wife Lilian lived in Bentley with their two small children. He had been in France nine months when, according to his captain, the unit had been advancing all day and were going forward again during the late afternoon of September 3rd 1918 when Edward was hit by machine gun bullet. His death was instantaneous and he was 30 years of age. He is buried at Anzac Cemetery, Pas de Calais.

Sapper FREDERICK JOHN WEBSTER  

Royal Berkshire Regiment (11819)

170th Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers (86565)

Fred was born in Nuneaton in 1894, the son of John Thomas and Eliza Webster, later of Wood End. He worked at Kingsbury Colliery and was one of the 'Kingsbury 200' who enlisted during the initial recruitment drive in September 1914. He went to the front in January 1915 and was killed in action on 13th August 1915 aged 20. His brother Walter was with him when he died. Fred is buried at Cambrin Military Cemetery, France

Stoker 1st Class GEORGE WILEMAN